ACCC Video Note – Telstra dodges mega penalty for mega dumb 5G play

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noreply@blogger.com (Mike Terceiro)

ACCC Video Note discussing the section 87B undertaking provided by Telstra to the ACCC on 3 August 2022 agreeing to deregister radiocommunications sites set up for the purpose or with the likely effect of interfering with the Optus 5G rollout in breach of section 46 of the Competition and Consumer

ACCC v Samsung Electronics Australia Pty Ltd [2022] FCA 875

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noreply@blogger.com (Mike Terceiro)

Video Case Note discussing Justice Murphy’s penalty decision in ACCC v Samsung Electronics Australia Pty Ltd [2022] FCA 875 concerning representations that Samsung Galaxy phones were suitable for use in swimming pools and sea water.

Regulatory Compliance

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noreply@blogger.com (Mike Terceiro)

Just finished this online course through the University of Pennsylvania. Pretty good course, with some interesting insights into why employees engage in high risk behaviour.

There was also a discussion of the “One Guy” problem in compliance – namely the rogue employee who knowingly or recklessly breaches the law, despite knowing

Legal decisions and analytics

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Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Should researchers collect and publish statistics which reveal how judges and tribunal members decide refugee cases? Is this a way of understanding legal decision making or does it risk undermining confidence in the justice system? 

Video Case Note – Checking out the Checkout case

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noreply@blogger.com (Mike Terceiro)

See my recent video case note outlining Justice Stevenson’s decision in The Checkout Pty Ltd v Cordell Jigsaw Productions Pty Ltd; Morrow v Cordell Jigsaw Productions Pty Ltd (No 13) 2022 NSWSC 444
























 

Who can hear an application to extend time for taxation?

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Stephen Warne

People out of time to seek taxation in Victoria customarily file and serve a summons for taxation in the Costs Court, within the Trial Division of the Supreme Court of Victoria.  A Judicial Registrar of that Court then refers the exension of time question  to the Practice Court, again within

Queensland bans 'claim farming'; Should media coverage affect sentencing decisions?

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Australian Broadcasting Corporation

Queensland has introduced laws to crack down on ‘claim farming’, a practice where members of the public are contacted and encouraged to make compensation claims. And a new study has found ‘inconsistencies’ in the way courts consider the possible impact of media coverage on sentencing decisions.

AER faces hardsell on Origin hardship penalty outcome

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noreply@blogger.com (Mike Terceiro)

AER Video Case note outlining the recent Federal Court decision of Moshinsky J in AER v Origin Energy Electricity Ltd [2022] FCA802, including a discussion of the numerous strange omissions from the penalty judgment and an analysis of whether a penalty equivalent to 0.12% of Origin’s annual turnover is likely

Is Child Support Compulsory?

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Jitesh Billimoria

 

In this video, Accredited Family Law Specialist and Page Provan Special Counsel Jitesh Billimoria discusses whether child support is necessary.

Transcript

Today I want to talk to you about if child support is compulsory. The simple answer is yes, it is. 

As

Vanuatu's push for international court action on climate change

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Australian Broadcasting Corporation

The small Pacific island nation of Vanuatu is behind a campaign to raise the issue of climate change before the International Court of Justice. And how should culturally sensitive historical photographs be handled? A leading US university is sued for allegedly causing emotional distress.

Victoria's Nazi swastika law prompts call for national ban

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ABC Radio

An in-depth look at Victoria’s law to ban the public display of the Nazi swastika amid calls for the Federal Government to legislate a national ban on the symbol. And the case of a West Australian man who spent more than a decade in prison for a crime he

Attorney General Mark Dreyfus speaks to the Law Report

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ABC Radio

Reforming the Public Interest Disclosure Act “is a significant matter because it is linked to the national anti-corruption commission that we hope to legislate this year,” the federal Attorney General Mark Dreyfus has told the Law Report. In a wide-ranging interview, Mr Dreyfus outlines his legislative priorities, including reforming

New City of Melbourne construction code takes effect

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Planning on building or developing property in central Melbourne? A new code of practice for building, construction and works in the City of Melbourne took effect on March 17.

This regulatory framework sets out the requirements that must be put in place at construction sites to ensure the safety and

How to avoid commercial disputes

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Commercial disputes are inevitable no matter the industry.

Take, for example, a long-running dispute between construction giant CIMIC and engineering services firm JKC Australia, which has just ended with CIMIC agreeing to make a $492.5 million payment.

That obviously wasn’t a good result for CIMIC. But the battle, which lasted

Judge v jury trials

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ABC Radio

Why did actor Johnny Depp’s defamation case against his former wife Amber Heard succeed in the US after failing at a similar trial in the UK? And a man ordered to face trial before a judge alone under the ACT’s pandemic emergency law says he was denied the right

What happens if your builder goes bust?

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A perfect storm of rising costs, supply issues and labour shortages has hit the Australian building industry, compounding problems caused by Covid-19 shutdowns.

As a result, several building firms have collapsed in recent months – including industry giants Probuild and Condev.

Master Builders Victoria has already warned these challenging business

Are there any recent cases about Section 9AC of the Sale of Land Act and material changes to plans of subdivision before registration?

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noreply@blogger.com (William Stark)

The property market for the sale of apartments in Victoria, Australia has become more challenging recently. 

Lockdowns and other restrictions resulting from COVID-19 such as density limits and mask wearing combined with absent foreign buyers, as well as general concern about the viability of some projects, caused banks to impose limits on

A $60 million breath of fresh air

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The Victorian government has encouraged applications for the $60 million Small Business Ventilation Program.

The funding is to help eligible public-facing small businesses improve their ventilation in areas accessible to customers and reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19.

The program offers two types of support:

Ventilation Rebate – A

Radio on the inside

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ABC Radio

The world’s only nationwide in-house prison network broadcasts 24 hours a day and is produced by and for inmates.

When is a de facto relationship over?

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ABC Radio

A High Court decision raises questions about how a de facto relationship is defined, and what happens when a person’s mental capacities decline with old age. And, if a person granted humanitarian protection by Australia commits a serious crime, can they be deported to a conflict zone?

Liquor Laws Overhaul To Revitalise Victoria’s Nightlife

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Victoria’s hospitality sector has been given a welcome boost, under new liquor reforms announced by the state government.

The new rules will mean bars, hotels, restaurants and cafes will now be able to serve alcohol until 1am without having to apply for a change to their licence (subject to any