Formulating a remedy for proprietary estoppel

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Cameron Charnley

A version of this case note originally featured in the Commercial Bar Association’s blog, ‘Commbar Matters’. A link to the original article can be found here— — —

Harris v Harris involved a claim of proprietary estoppel arising from a series of promises made by a father to bestow land on his sons.[1]

For a Business Owner: How This Is Likely to Play Out

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Bruce Provan

Once you have decided or you have come to the realisation there is no prospect of reconciliation, it is usually best to start the process of negotiating parenting and financial arrangements sooner rather than later. In most cases, the longer the process drags out, the more difficult it becomes. Especially

Separation – This Can Go a Number of Ways

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Bruce Provan

If you haven’t already done so, the first decision you need to make is whether you want to separate. Separation is not only life-changing and emotionally taxing — it is also stressful, difficult, time-consuming and can be very expensive. In my experience, where one party has decided to separate, the

Getting Married and Having a Child Should Not Be so Hard

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Stephen Page

Life is grand. I am the luckiest man to live. Due to changes in the law, I have been allowed to marry- and to have a child with the person I love. While getting married and having a child seem self-evident truths, for LGBTIQ+ couples the law (and until 40

Vaccine passports and global snapshot of LGBTQI discrimination

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ABC Radio

Some countries and states have introduced a Vaccine Passport, to allow more domestic and international movement and businesses to return. What are the technical and legal obstacles to a COVID-19 vaccine passport here in Australia? And in this Pride Month, while the LGBTQI community has a lot to celebrate

2019: Not Such a Good Year (Environment, Part II)

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Stephen Warne

The endangered greater glider, nearly a metre long, one of the biggest gliding mammals in the world, lives for 15 years, eats gum leaves, glides for 100 m between, ideally, tall old trees with hollows to bunk down in.

Today is World Environment Day.  It prompted me

Who is responsible when external cladding fails in an apartment tower during a fire – Court of appeal?

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noreply@blogger.com (William Stark)

Further to my post about the fall out from the Lacrosse Tower fire in VCAT (see:  https://melbournepropertylaw.blogspot.com/2020/01/who-is-responsible-when-external.html), the Court of Appeal recently handed down its decision on the appeal from VCAT. 

In Tanah Merah Vic Pty Ltd v Owners’ Corporation No 1 of PS631436T [2021] VSCA 72, Beach, Osborn JJA and Stynes AJA

Are there any recent cases about a mortgagee's duty of good faith in selling secured property in pandemic times?

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noreply@blogger.com (William Stark)

The Supreme Court of Queensland (Holmes CJ) has recently considered the duty of a mortgagee in selling a secured property in uncertain economic times (ie during a pandemic). In HSBC Bank Australia Ltd v Wang & Ors [2021] QSC 58, the Court considered an application to remove a caveat lodged by

Porter v ABC and  AGL v Greenpeace

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ABC Radio

Former Attorney General Christian Porter has discontinued his defamation litigation against the ABC. And power company AGL is taking Greenpeace to court arguing breach of trademark and copyright. AGL says the activist group should not have used its trademark in a series of parody advertisements that highlights its CO2