How itchy underpants created Australia's consumer laws

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ABC Radio

If a consumer is injured by a faulty product, they can sue the manufacturer. In Australia, The law of Negligence or Torts forms a fundamental building block of our legal system. As reporter Carly Godden discovers, these laws owe much of their origins to a case from the 1930’s

Court of Appeal eschews recourse to the Planning and Environment Act 1987 when construing a restriction on a plan

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Matthew Townsend

It’s long been established that equitable restrictive covenants or restrictive covenants inter partes should be construed in a common sense and non-technical way, with the objective being to ascertain the intention of the parties by reference to the words in … Continue reading →

'Squatters' rights', and UK health laws

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ABC Radio

The Law Report revisits a New South Wales Supreme Court ruling against a retirement village developer that claimed ‘squatters’ rights’, or adverse possession, over a Sydney property. And two court decisions highlight important issues in Britain’s health laws.

Sue Neill-Fraser loses appeal against murder conviction

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ABC Radio

Tasmanian woman Sue Neill-Fraser’s latest appeal has failed to overturn her murder conviction for the death of Bob Chappell, her former partner who disappeared from a yacht moored off Hobart in 2009. Has the appeal shed new light on a case in which a body was never found?

Sue Neill-Fraser loses appeal against murder conviction

This post was originally published on this site

ABC Radio

Tasmanian woman Sue Neill-Fraser’s latest appeal has failed to overturn her murder conviction for the death of Bob Chappell, her former partner who disappeared from a yacht moored off Hobart in 2009. Has the appeal shed new light on a case in which a body was never found?