When is a de facto relationship over?

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ABC Radio

A High Court decision raises questions about how a de facto relationship is defined, and what happens when a person’s mental capacities decline with old age. And, if a person granted humanitarian protection by Australia commits a serious crime, can they be deported to a conflict zone?

Case note – Williams v Toyota Motor Corporation 2022 FCA 344

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noreply@blogger.com (Mike Terceiro)

Check out my video case note outlining the recent decision of Justice Lee of the Federal Court in Williams v Toyota Motor Corporation 2022 FCA 344 – a class action against Toyota concerning defective diesel exhaust after-treatment systems in Prado, Fortuner and HiLux ranges sold between October 2015 and April

Alphabet in the Soup: Google facing three multi-billion Euro abuse of dominance fines

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noreply@blogger.com (Mike Terceiro)

Check out my most recent video presentation in which I provide an overview of the European Commission’s three decisions in relation to Google’s alleged anticompetitive conduct – (1) the Comparison Shopping case, (2) the Android case and the (3) Adsense case.

Pretty proud of both my pun “Alphabet in the Soup”

Why gender diversity on the bench is important

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ABC Radio

In the second of a two-part series, the Law Report speaks with members of the International Association of Women Judges in several countries. They explain the obstacles women judges face and what gender diversity brings to legal decision making. 

Tribunal finds GST payable on subdivision of land

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In Ian Mark Collins & Mieneke Mianno Collins ATF The Collins Retirement Fund and Commissioner of Taxation (Taxation) [2022] AATA 628 (4 April 2022) the Tribunal determined that the applicant taxpayer was liable to pay GST on the subdivision of land into 11 lots and the sale of those lots.

High Court rulings clarify contract worker status

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ABC Radio

The High Court has delivered two judgments that help clarify the legal distinction between the status of a contract worker and a employee, with potential long-term implications across Australian workplaces. Also in the program, a neighbourhood dispute that grew ‘out of all proportion’ ends in the New South Wales

Are Australia's political donation laws fit for purpose?

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ABC Radio

The Australian Electoral Commission has revealed that 10 donors account for a quarter of donations made to the country’s political parties in the 2020-21 financial year. According to the Commission, the source of one third of all political income remains undisclosed. What does the data reveal and what does

Inside Thomas Embling Hospital, a forensic health facility

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ABC Radio

For the first time a journalist is allowed to record in the Thomas Embling Hospital, Melbourne’s Forensic healthcare facility. Meet therapists, the psychiatrist in charge and some of the patients who have committed a serious crime but are deemed not responsible for their actions due to mental illness.

Inside Thomas Embling Hospital, a forensic health facility

This post was originally published on this site

ABC Radio

For the first time a journalist is allowed to record in the Thomas Embling Hospital, Melbourne’s Forensic healthcare facility. Meet therapists, the psychiatrist in charge and some of the patients who have committed a serious crime but are deemed not responsible for their actions due to mental illness.

How itchy underpants created Australia's consumer laws

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ABC Radio

If a consumer is injured by a faulty product, they can sue the manufacturer. In Australia, The law of Negligence or Torts forms a fundamental building block of our legal system. As reporter Carly Godden discovers, these laws owe much of their origins to a case from the 1930’s

'Squatters' rights', and UK health laws

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ABC Radio

The Law Report revisits a New South Wales Supreme Court ruling against a retirement village developer that claimed ‘squatters’ rights’, or adverse possession, over a Sydney property. And two court decisions highlight important issues in Britain’s health laws.

Sue Neill-Fraser loses appeal against murder conviction

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ABC Radio

Tasmanian woman Sue Neill-Fraser’s latest appeal has failed to overturn her murder conviction for the death of Bob Chappell, her former partner who disappeared from a yacht moored off Hobart in 2009. Has the appeal shed new light on a case in which a body was never found?

Sue Neill-Fraser loses appeal against murder conviction

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ABC Radio

Tasmanian woman Sue Neill-Fraser’s latest appeal has failed to overturn her murder conviction for the death of Bob Chappell, her former partner who disappeared from a yacht moored off Hobart in 2009. Has the appeal shed new light on a case in which a body was never found?

'Body modification' on trial

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ABC Radio

In a precedent-setting case, a New South Wales judge has found self-proclaimed extreme body modification artist Brendan Leigh Russell guilty of female genital mutilation, grievous bodily harm, and manslaughter. Is consent a valid legal defence when cosmetic ‘body modification’ procedures go wrong?

Adriana Rivas mounts new appeal against Chile extradition

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ABC Radio

Should Sydney woman Adriana Rivas, who is accused of being a Pinochet-era intelligence agent, be extradited to Chile over alleged crimes against humanity? The full bench of the Federal Court is set to hear her latest appeal this week. And calls for Australia to investigate allegations of war crimes

Assange extradition appeal, WikiLeaks and journalism

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ABC Radio

Britain’s High Court is set to hear the United States government’s appeal against a ruling blocking the extradition of Julian Assange on mental health grounds. And warnings that US attempts to prosecute the WikiLeaks founder for publishing classified government documents could have devastating implications for press freedom.

Climate science dismissal case sparks academic freedom debate, High Court quashes Palmer $30bn WA compensation challenge

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ABC Radio

A long-running unfair dismissal case involving Queensland university professor Peter Ridd has sparked intense debate around questions of academic freedom. Also in the program: the High Court has quashed a legal challenge by mining magnate-turned-politician Clive Palmer against laws designed to ban his company from suing the West Australian

'Squatters' rights', and UK health laws

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ABC Radio

The New South Wales Supreme Court has ruled against a retirement village developer claiming ‘squatters’ rights’, or adverse possession, over a Sydney property. And two court decisions highlight important issues in UK health law: the legality of severe disability as a reason for late-term abortions and access to puberty-suppressing